Clocked Chauffeur vehicles could be commonplace

Hundreds of clocked chauffeur vehicles could unknowingly be in operation, as the biggest car clocking case in British legal history concluded this week.

Automotive data experts hpi has revealed the number of cars on UK roads showing mileage discrepancies has risen to one in 16 – a jump of 25 per cent. The figure has leapt from one in 20 cars in 2014.

The figures emerge following the convictions of the operators of Runcorn-based chauffeur services company, PCS.

Commenting on the apparent increase in the practice, Barry Shorto, head of industry relations at cap hpi, said: “There are numerous reasons why clocking is on the up. The continued development of technologies to alter digital odometers, increasingly easy access to this technology via the internet and similarly, the ease of access to mileage adjustment services online, some of whom will behave legitimately, others less so. The increase in mileage-related finance arrangements such as PCP and PCH may also be a contributing factor.”

hpi, the UK’s leading authority on vehicle checking services, estimates that used car buyers now have a one in 16 chance of purchasing a vehicle with a mileage discrepancy, with the practice costing motorists over £800 million every year.

Mr Shorto added: “The message to clockers is clear – it’s only a matter of time before they are caught and brought to justice.  hpi remains committed against clocking as well as raising awareness of the value of its National Mileage Register.”

The operators of PCS were jailed this week following a three-year investigation where it’s believed more than seven million miles have been taken from an array of chauffeur vehicles.